Category Archives: Opinion

SF Pride

Yesterday, my hubby and I and friends got a chance to march in the San Francisco Pride parade with the Bay Area Young Survivors – and organization that provides support for those diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 45 (ish). The group is an intentionally open organization – often looking at which gender pronouns… Read More »

Not fighting a battle – the closure to the narrative is death itself

Recently, I read a book chapter by Arthur Frank (2009) titled “The necessity and dangers of illness narratives, especially at the end of life”. It got me thinking. One of the pet peeves among many cancer bloggers as well as those with metastatic breast cancer is cancer as a war metaphor – that is, the… Read More »

Driving, chemobrain, and respectfully acknowledging side effects

While driving back from a nice long weekend at Yosemite, I found myself singing along to music while simultaneously navigating through an interchange of highway on and off ramps, to get to the right place. What struck me then, was that I must be getting back to some form of cognitive health. Cancer plays havoc… Read More »

Neuropathy update

It has occurred to me that it has been a long time since I’ve talked about my chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. At about this time last year I saw a pain doctor. Just in passing he mentioned the option of a 24-hour time released gabapentin (known as Horizant). It often isn’t mentioned because it isn’t… Read More »

Patient Health Literacy

I posted this originally over on my academic blog: http://rjh.goingeast.ca. However, I think those who read this blog are in a better position to answer the question I’m asking at the bottom – so please bear with some of the academic language. In Arthur Frank’s (1995) seminal book The Wounded Storyteller, he cautions “On rare… Read More »