This makes me sad

By | Wed September 9, 2015

I learned from my friend today that Jac lost her life to breast cancer. I didn’t know Jac but I knew a little about her story. She was diagnosed after me. I remember when my friend told me that her friend was diagnosed. I offered to be a point of contact, but Jac didn’t reach out – that is OK, not everyone diagnosed needs or wants a distant person to talk to.

I make it a point to engage with anyone that makes the effort to reach out to me, as so many distant and close people have been there for me.

Learning of Jac’s recurrence and progression saddened me. That was only two weeks ago, so it was a bit of a shock when I returned to my hotel room this evening to learn of her death. It was too fast. It is hard to explain how the death of someone I never knew could shake me, but it does. She is the first person that I know, who was diagnosed after me, to die. She was 34 and a young mother (she found her lump while pregnant, it was dismissed as nothing to worry about), which makes this extra sad.

I knew this day would come. I know that at some point several of my new friends are going to die – metastatic breast cancer (that is when breast cancer spreads to bones, liver, lungs, brain) kills. It makes me sad.

 

2 thoughts on “This makes me sad

  1. thesmallc

    I am very sorry. She was so young and left a family behind. So sad and upsetting.

    I completely understand why this would affect you. Every time I hear of someone dying from breast cancer I experience a lot of emotions: fear, guilt, anxiety, sadness and anger. It’s just awful to see so many women die from this disease everyday and it’s even worse to see that there isn’t enough action to help prevent it — aren’t we losing enough? I am scared I am next. I worry the people I’ve connected with the last few years will die too. I don’t want any of us to die from bc (or any other cancer). This is all wrong.

    Reply
  2. Jeffrey Keefer

    Very sorry to hear this. Sometimes life does not progress as we would hope, and it seems unfair and unsettling. Let’s hope in moving on we can remember this as an experience that brings different levels of meaning and be thankful for what we are able to do in our own time.

    Reply

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